Lessons from a Purple Dragon: Exploring Game Search Spaces

I think I first played the first Spyro the Dragon game when I was about seven years old. I’m not sure what attracted me to the game. It might have been the idea of collecting bright, shiny gems, the rather gentle learning curve (unlike the Crash Bandicoot, Contra or Metal Slug games that I remember having access to on the PS1 at that time) or perhaps the exploration required to complete a 100% clear of the game.

More recently, a collection of all three games in remastered form was released on PC. I never actually got round to playing Spyro 3, for some reason, and the first two games were pretty enjoyable, so I purchased it. It was available on Steam for £34.99, though I searched elsewhere and managed to procure it for just £13.10.

In Spyro 1, the titular purple dragon has flame breath, is able to charge at enemies with his horns, and can jump and glide around (though he cannot fly). Levels in Spyro 1 generally feature a mostly linear path from a level’s starting point to its exit, with enemies and obstacles along the path; figuring out how to traverse this path can be interesting, in that one usually needs to understand how enemy attacks work, and/or how Spyro can navigate relevant obstacles, typically through judicious platforming.

However, reaching each level’s exit is rarely the end goal. Typically, levels contain a number of gems (and sometimes dragon eggs as well), and collecting these requires exploration beyond the main route. Although I certainly wasn’t familiar with the abstract concept at that time, when I first played these levels as a seven-year-old I would usually perform a depth-first search. I would head down an interesting path until it reached a dead end or looped back to somewhere I’d already explored, and then continue to a new path that hadn’t been searched yet.

Depth first search is naturally a reasonable way to explore a game world. Since players can’t teleport freely, breadth first search is generally not an option. Iterative deepening-style approaches could make sense if paths are uni-directional or if there are frequently very long routes that don’t need to be explored on the way from one area of interest to another, as it is usually possible to exit and re-enter levels from the beginning. However, this isn’t generally true in Spyro level designs. Thus, for Spyro I don’t think this core process has changed very much. What keeps Spyro interesting for me tends to not be about overcoming the obstacles on a given path (with some exceptions), but instead about identifying legitimate paths that can be plausibly explored. A simple example is in one of the areas in World 1, Town Square; there is an optional area accessed by gliding down a staircase and around a wall. This eluded me for a long time when I was seven, as clearing most of the levels (in the sense of reaching the exit, not 100% completion) can be done with gliding in mostly straight lines.

Typically, the game will give you hints that such hidden areas exist. Most obviously, each level has a number of gems to collect, and this number is known to the player – so shortfalls typically indicate that there are still hidden areas to be found (provided the player has meticulously collected everything in the areas they have already explored). It is also fairly common for some gems to be visible from one of the main paths, even if it is not made obvious how to reach them. With the Town Square example, one of the dragons in the area does actually give you a big hint on what to do, though I wasn’t aware of this as I skipped cutscenes then.

I usually had to resort to walkthroughs or online guides to find these answers in the past. I’m pretty confident it was quite different from the way I’d approach these problems now. I think I mostly just tried a ton of different approaches and saw what worked. However, I now use deductive reasoning more heavily – perhaps experience with participating in logic puzzle contests has helped. Instead of simply exploring paths that come to light and trying things that look encouraging, I tend to apply a perhaps more principled approach to identifying suitable routes to explore once the obvious methods have been tried. I would consider the usual platforming techniques that may be appropriate and test them against the level setup (e.g. Is there a high point I could glide from? Could there be some non-obvious platforms that are actually safe to land on? If there is/are supercharge ramps that increase Spyro’s running and jumping speed, can I use these? Can I combine them?). I’ve been able to solve quite a number of levels that I wasn’t able to in the past.

Some of this reminds me of a book I read earlier this year, Problem Solving 101: A Simple Book For Smart People by Ken Watanabe. The techniques introduced there for making decisions on how to approach problems are applicable to clearing a Spyro level – for various root causes/problems what one should do varies, and it is probably more expedient to think through what needs to be considered in a principled way than scurry off aggressively pursuing whatever solution comes to mind. I don’t think I’ve ever been faced with a level sufficiently difficult to need drawing a full-blown logic tree out, but even mapping out such a tree in my mind helps a lot.


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