Tracking Times at Imperial

Graph of my work time at Imperial

The graph you see above reflects the number of hours I spent on “work” each week, from the week starting 5th October 2015 (I finished my internship at Palantir on the 2nd of October) up to the week starting 5th September 2016 (I started full-time at Palantir on the 12th). Obviously, this includes all time spent explicitly on academic work, at Palantir (social events do not count) as well as time spent tutoring (inclusive of marking and preparing the problem sheets). There’s more to it, though – I place work in quotation marks, as there are quite a number of activities that people might not classify as work that I do count towards the total, such as having 1:1 syncs with people and personal reviews.

I’ve annotated the significant peaks and troughs on the graph with some of the events that had taken place around then that contributed to why I worked so much (or so little). You’ll see that I’ve shaded the part of the graph above 70 on the y-axis in red; for me at least, I think I instinctively start feeling some degree of push-back at that point (and I’ve been cautioned that 70 is already pretty far on this).

Typically, when I look at a graph, I try and identify things that I find to stand out as unusual, and then seek explanation for them. Initially, what does stand out to me is the relative lack of height of the peak labelled (6), the weeks leading up to the end of the Final Project; I would have expected something quite a bit more. I’d attribute this to the sheer cognitive difficulty of the final stages of said project; I remember finding that I would be drained very, very quickly when working on it. I guess for the final project I worked at it pretty consistently over the year, so there was no need for a massive surge at the end as well.

I notice extremely sharp drop-offs (A) and (B) after the end of term 1 and 2, yet no such drop-off exists after term 3. Perhaps, this is a signal that the 58.95 or 61.25 averages in those terms are too harsh (summer term was a relatively tame 52.33), and this does already factor in exam week or week 11, which tends to be less intense as I need to conserve my energy for the examinations themselves. I tend to think of week 8 or 9 as the busiest week in each term, owing to exam revision, and this pattern is reflected in peak (5), but seems absent in term 1 which, in fact, exhibits a convex sequence. This might feed back into the earlier point about considering 70 hours a week as a dangerous point to be insufficiently prudent; there is a crash even after a series of weeks in the 60s.

Although I recompiled this graph recently, I first performed the labelling in September just before I started at Palantir. Nonetheless, looking back at it about two months later, one of the labels stands out to me, that being (A) perhaps because in and of itself it does not seem to give a proper explanation of why the trough (or peak, in the other cases) was there. I did return to Singapore to spend time with my family and a few friends, but it wasn’t really the case that I did very much on that front – in fact, a fair chunk of my time in Singapore went towards MCMAS* (which explains that mid-50 spike, which is actually the week starting 28th December) and Fallout 4 (which, of course, did not count).

It’s heartening for me at least to see that I have a fair degree of intrinsic motivation, as shown by the red line. Over the roughly two months, I managed to work on MCMAS-Dynamic, program extensions for Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes (and, in doing so, revisit programming in C#), set up this website, complete a full retrospective round of the first and second year examinations and learn more about personal finance and investment.

Clearly, the data may be analysed as a time series; in fact, I have bucketed this graph into weekly aggregates, but I do have data down to a daily granularity. An alternative way of handling the daily data could have been to compute a simple or exponential moving average of the data, though I don’t really like doing this at a daily granularity is because of very clear seasonality (in particular, I tend to work the most on Tuesdays, or Wednesdays part-time at Palantir; I work the least on Thursdays and Sundays).

I only did this in year 4; it would be interesting to see how the time profile would have looked like in previous years and how similar it might have been, though the different structure of each academic year would probably have made the series look somewhat different (for example, the beginning of the third term in year 3, very near the (B) trough, would have been a very high peak as I aggressively ramped up for the industrial placement at Palantir).

This was a rather interesting exercise, even without looking into the distribution of time across modules and/or activities. If that is factored in, there are other interesting patterns; for example, the amount of time spent on MCMAS, which involved considerable surges after each set of exams was dealt with, and the time spent on 1:1s and syncs, which was generally a few hours per week but had a 12.5 blip in the final week of the summer term (before people dispersed) and a 10 somewhere later on (maximum likelihood guess would be meeting three of the guys I regularly sync with nowadays for meals on three distinct occasions).

I haven’t been doing this as rigorously ever since I started at Palantir, mainly because the initial impetus behind this initiative was actually understanding which modules I was spending a disproportionate amount of time on (Computing for Optimal Decisions, Software Reliability), and also because I had ready access to my personal email accounts (I tracked the data using Google Calendar); also, my work is far more reactive to changes that may happen because some high-priority issue appeared. Perhaps using it for spare time could be useful, but then the administrative overhead is much larger relative to the time actually being tracked – to a point where I’m not sure it’s worthwhile.

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